Fetal outcome in women with borderline amniotic fluid index at pregnancy 36 weeks and beyond

Authors

  • Sweta Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hindu Rao hospital and NDMC Medical College, Delhi, India
  • Suman Lata Mendiratta Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hindu Rao hospital and NDMC Medical College, Delhi, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20232931

Keywords:

Border line AFI, Oligohydramnios, Meconium, Perinatal, Caesarean

Abstract

Background: Aim of the study were to evaluate the fetal outcome associated with borderline amniotic fluid index (AFI) at pregnancy 36 weeks and beyond and to study the mode of delivery among these patients.

Methods: A 60 pregnant subjects who were at 36-42 weeks period of gestation and ultrasonically diagnosed to have AFI less than or equal to 8 cm were included in the study and were compared to 50 pregnant patients with normal amniotic fluid. They were monitored throughout labour and fetal outcome was studied.

Results: Fetal distress was observed in 60.4% cases leading to immediate termination of pregnancy. Incidence of meconium stained liquor was found significantly high (75%). Neonatal morbidity was found to be significantly high. Low birth weight (31.6%), Apgar score less than 7 at 5 minutes (20%), NICU admission (71.6%), meconium stained liquor (23.3%) were observed.

Conclusions: That there is a high risk of adverse perinatal outcome in cases of Borderline AFI at pregnancy 36 weeks and beyond. Providing intensive intrapartum monitoring and good NICU facilities for such cases is necessary to optimise the fetal outcome.

References

Nicolini U, Fisk NM, Rodeck CH, Talbert DG, Wigglesworth JS. Low amniotic pressure in oligohydramniosis this the cause of pulmonary hypoplasia? Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1989;161(5):1098-101.

American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists: Ultrasonography in Pregnancy. Washington DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. 2009.113(2 Pt 1):451-61.

Phelan JP, Smith CV, Broussard P, Small M. Amniotic fluid volume assessment with the fourquadrant technique at 36-42 weeks' gestation. J Reproduct Med. 1987;32(7):540-2.

Banks EH, Miller DA. Perinatal risks associated with borderline amniotic fluid index. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999;180:1461-3.

Kreiser D, El-Sayed YY, Sorem KA, Chitkara U, Holbrook RH Jr, Druzin ML. Decreased amniotic fluid index in low-risk pregnancy. J Reprod Med. 2001;46:743-6.

Brace RA, Wolf EJ. Normal amniotic fluid volume changes throughout pregnancy. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1989;161(2):382-8.

Gaikwad PR, Oswal MS, Gandhewar MR, Bhatiyani BR. Perinatal outcome in oligohydramnios and borderline amniotic fluid index: a comparative study. Int J Reproduct Contracep Obstet Gynecol. 2016;5(6):1964-8.

Ghike S, Reddy G, Ghike NW. Increasing Severity of Oligohydramnios: A risk factor for outcome. J South Asian Feder Obst Gynae. 2013;5(1):8-10.

Pandey U, Stephen L. Perinatal outcome in cases of borderline oligohydramnios. Indian J Obstetr Gynecol Res. 2018;5(3):405-8.

Puri M, Sharma K. Low amniotic fluid index and intra-natal and perinatal outcome in term pregnancy. Int J Med Heal Res. 2017;3(11):129-13.

Downloads

Published

2023-09-28

Issue

Section

Original Research Articles