A successful pregnancy outcome following embolisation for post modified Manchester Fothergill haemorrhage: an interesting case report

Authors

  • Hemina A. Baldota Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Mitali V. Sharma Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Shrutika O. Makde Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Prasad Y. Deshmukh Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Amarjeet Kaur P. Bava Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Vibha S. More Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Arun H. Nayak Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20222489

Keywords:

Pelvic organ prolapse, Cervical elongation, Manchester Fothergill

Abstract

Genital prolapse is one of the most common disorder affecting women of varying age group; though it typically affects older and parous women. Malfunction of the pelvic support is the most common cause of this disorder. Increasing age and excess weight are established risk factors for pelvic organ prolapse.In young nulliparous women conservative surgery is preferred to preserve the fertility of the patient. The approach of surgery can be either vaginal or abdominal depending on the classification of prolapse. We reported a rare case of a 36-year-old P1L0 (IUFD1) A1 with cervical elongation who was apprehensive to have a child. She was managed at our institute and had a successful pregnancy outcome in spite of undergoing embolization for secondary haemorrhage following modified Manchester-Fothergill operation.

Author Biography

Hemina A. Baldota, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College, Sion, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, JUNIOR RESIDENT

References

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Published

2022-09-27

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Section

Case Reports