Clinical features of endometriosis: a review of literature

Authors

  • Rajashree Thatikonda Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Grant Medical College and Sir J. J. Group of Hospitals Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Tushar Palve Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Grant Medical College and Sir J. J. Group of Hospitals Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Soheil Shaikh Department of Surgery, Grant Medical College and Sir J. J. Group of Hospitals Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Priya Bulchandnani Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Grant Medical College and Sir J. J. Group of Hospitals Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Sejal Kulkarni Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Grant Medical College and Sir J. J. Group of Hospitals Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Komal Devnikar Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Grant Medical College and Sir J. J. Group of Hospitals Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20223484

Keywords:

Deep infiltrating endometriosis, Ultrasonography, Magnetic resonance imaging

Abstract

Aim: To know the clinical features and prevalence of infertility

in endometriosis.

Objectives: 

1. to discuss clinical features of endometriosis

2. to know the prevalence of infertility in endometriosis

Material and methods:

Background: The study shows the clinical features of endometriosis, common laparoscopic findings of endometriosis, and incidence in a particular age group. Objectives of current study were to discuss the clinical features of endometriosis and to know the prevalence of infertility in endometriosis

Methods: Cases of infertility, chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhoea, and laparoscopically diagnosed endometriosis were considered for this study.

Results: Endometriosis is a disease in which the endometrium (the tissue that lines the inside of the uterus or womb) is present outside the uterus. Endometriosis most commonly occurs in the lower abdomen or pelvis, but it can appear anywhere in the body. Symptoms of endometriosis include lower abdominal pain, dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, and infertility.

Conclusions: This study show typical clinical features and prevalence of infertility in patients with endometriosis in a tertiary care centre.

Cases of infertility, chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhoea, and laparoscopically diagnosed endometriosis were considered for this study. 

Results and conclusion: 

Endometriosis is a disease in which the endometrium (the tissue that lines the inside of the uterus or womb) is present outside of the uterus. Endometriosis most commonly occurs in the lower abdomen or pelvis, but it can appear anywhere in the body. Symptoms of endometriosis include lower abdominal pain, dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, and infertility. This study is to know the common clinical features and prevalence of infertility in patients with endometriosis in a tertiary care centre.

References

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Published

2022-12-28

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Original Research Articles