Risk factor and perinatal outcome in umbilical cord prolapse

Authors

  • Pratyusha Borthakur Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, SDUAHER, Kolar, Karnataka, India https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1005-8594
  • Munikrishna Munisamaih Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, SDUAHER, Kolar, Karnataka, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20230021

Keywords:

Umbilical cord, Perinatal outcome, Obstetrics emergency, LSCS, Diagnosis delivery interval, APGAR score

Abstract

Background: This study is done to determine the risk factors and the perinatal outcomes in umbilical cord prolapse in a tertiary care centre. Umbilical cord prolapse is an utmost obstetrical emergency, which requires prompt intervention to have a good perinatal outcome. Identification of umbilical cord prolapse is of utmost important. Due to exposure of the cord to the external environment, the vessels undergo spasm, which leads to fetal compromise. Delivery of the baby either via caesarean section or vaginal delivery is required immediately following diagnosis. The goal of the current study is to identify the risk factor and also to see the perinatal outcome of umbilical cord prolapse in a tertiary care centre.

Methods: It is a retrospective study conducted in R. L. Jalappa hospital, Kolar from June 2021 to June 2022. Out of 2570 deliveries at our facility throughout the study period, 45 cases were that of umbilical cord prolapse, who were chosen for this study. Both singleton and twin pregnancies were considered. Women below 28 weeks of gestation was not included in the study.

Results: In this study, 45 patients were evaluated who had come with umbilical cord prolapse. It was seen that umbilical cord prolapse occurred in women of multiparity, 36% of the total study population. It was more commonly seen in fetuses weighing 1.5-3 kg, at term (93.3%). Babies that were delivered within 10 minutes of the diagnosis of umbilical cord prolapse has a survival rate of 100%. Whereas the babies delivered after 30 minutes of the diagnosis of cord prolapse did not survive.

Conclusions: Umbilical cord prolapse is associated with increased perinatal morbidity, especially if diagnosed late.

References

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Published

2023-01-12

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Original Research Articles