Study of fetomaternal outcome in congenital heart disease in pregnancy in IPGME and R and SSKM Hospital, Kolkata

Authors

  • Baishakhi Mandal Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, IPGME and R and SSKM Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20230522

Keywords:

CHD in pregnancy, Assisted vaginal delivery, Normal vaginal delivery, CHD and fetus, Complication in heart disease

Abstract

Background: Because of improving medical and surgical management, most infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) will reach reproductive age, and women are now presenting for obstetric and congenital cardiac care, many following reparative cardiac surgery or intervention. The maternal and fetal risk of a pregnancy for this population will depend on the anatomic and physiologic classification of the type of CHD. Aim of the study was to determine any complications during pregnancy and after birth in pregnant mother with CHD and to find out any complications of newborn baby, born to a mother with CHD.

Methods: The present study was descriptive observational study. This study was conducted for 1 year in department of obstetrics and gynaecology, IPGME and R and SSKMH, Kolkata, sample size 71.

Results: In our study there is no maternal death. Most of patients had vaginal delivery under local anesthesia. Thus, concluding early intervention and proper follow up can reduce the morbidity and mortality in CHD mother, vaginal delivery should be preferred in case of CHD in pregnancy. Also, baby born to CHD mother do not suffer from the same disease.

Conclusions: We concluded that early intervention and proper antenatal check-up can improve the outcome of the pregnant women with CHD as well as the baby, combined obstetrics and cardiac follow-up can reduced maternal mortality rate. There is no correlation between mother heart diseases with baby.

References

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Published

2023-02-27

Issue

Section

Original Research Articles