A study on lactate dehydrogenase levels in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and its correlation with feto-maternal outcome

Authors

  • Adarsh Preet Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Grant Government Medical College and JJ Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Ashok R. Anand Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Grant Government Medical College and JJ Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20232293

Keywords:

Hypertensive disorders, Lactate dehydrogenase levels, Maternal outcome

Abstract

Background: Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are one of the most common medical disorders seen during pregnancy. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an intracellular enzyme. The objective of this study was to compare lactate dehydrogenase levels in women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and normal pregnant women, to correlate lactate dehydrogenase levels with complications of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and role of lactate dehydrogenase as an early predictor of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Methods: A study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at JJ group of hospitals, Mumbai, India for a duration of 18 months from January 2020 to June 2021. This study has a sample size of 500 antenatal patients. Necessary information such as their detailed clinical, and obstetric history, clinical examination, investigations was noted. LDH were measured at 12-16 weeks of pregnancy and at the time of delivery.

Results: In our study, the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy was 10.2% There was no association between LDH levels at 12-16 weeks of gestation and development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. There was association between levels of lactate dehydrogenase levels at time of delivery and severity of hypertensive disorders in our study. Higher serum LDH levels were associated with increased incidence of maternal and fetal complications like abruption placenta, HELLP syndrome, IUGR, IUFD, prematurity and oligohydramnios in our study.

Conclusions: Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are one of the medical conditions affecting pregnancy. Lactate dehydrogenase levels at 12-16 weeks of gestation is not early predictor of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Serum lactate dehydrogenase levels at time of delivery helps in prediction of severity of disease, adverse outcomes and complications of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Hence lactate dehydrogenase acts as prognostic factor in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

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Published

2023-07-28

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Original Research Articles