Correlation between vitamin D levels in third trimester and postpartum hemorrhage

Authors

  • Poornima H. N. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hassan Institute of Medical Sciences, Hassan, Karnataka, India
  • Nayanashree V. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hassan Institute of Medical Sciences, Hassan, Karnataka, India
  • Premalatha H. L. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hassan Institute of Medical Sciences, Hassan, Karnataka, India
  • Nirmala Doreswamy Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hassan Institute of Medical Sciences, Hassan, Karnataka, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20240133

Keywords:

Postpartum hemorrhage, Uterine atony, Vitamin D

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between antenatal vitamin D levels and postpartum hemorrhage.

Methods: An analytical study was conducted among 385 term pregnant women admitted at Hassan institute of Medical Sciences and who went in spontaneous onset of labour or induced labour. Basic demographic details were noted. Vitamin D levels were assessed on admission in these patients prior to childbirth. Incidence of postpartum haemorrhage among these patients after delivery were noted and analysed.

Results: Vitamin D levels were deficient in 225 (58.5%) antenatal women in the study. The overall rates of atonic postpartum haemorrhage were higher in vitamin D deficient women that is 19 (54.2%) when compared to woman having normal vitamin D levels.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent among pregnant woman and is a risk factor for atonic postpartum hemorrhage. Hence antenatal supplementation of vitamin D could help prevent vitamin D deficiency and uterine atony.

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Published

2024-01-29

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Original Research Articles