A rare case report on complications in pregnancy with systemic lupus erythematosus in a post-renal transplant patient

Authors

  • Niranjan N. Chavan Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4643-240X
  • Darshana P. Ajmera Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Deepali S. Kapote Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Prasad Y. Deshmukh Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Zubin N. Sheriar Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Zeba Haroon Pathan Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Manan M. Boob Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2574-4378

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20241094

Keywords:

SLE, Renal transplant, Immunosuppressive medication, Pre-eclampsia, Hypertension

Abstract

To preview the feto-maternal outcome in post-renal transplant pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To distinguish preeclampsia from hypertension in renal transplant recipients as diagnosis is not always straightforward and all differentials need a thorough evaluation. Hypertension is a prevalent issue among kidney transplant recipients, with reported incidence rates ranging from 52% to 69%. Additionally, the occurrence of pre-eclampsia in renal transplant recipients falls within the range of 24% to 38%, demonstrating a significantly elevated risk compared to the 4-5% incidence rate seen in the general population. A 29-year-old female para 1 IUFD 1 abortion 1, in a known case of SLE with hypothyroidism with lupus nephritis with post renal transplant status with thrombocytopenia with preeclampsia with day 7 of emergency LSCS done in view of non-progress of labor with intrauterine fetal demise with abruptio placenta referred in view of query SLE flare or severe preeclamptic features with rectus sheath hematoma. Renal transplant restores fertility; thus, pregnancy requires careful planning and affected women should be managed in tertiary care obstetrics centers working in tight multidisciplinary cooperation with transplant physicians.

References

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Bermas BL, Smith NA. Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. 2024. Available at: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/pregnancy-in-women-with-systemic-lupus-erythematosus. Accessed on 12 January, 2024.

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Published

2024-04-26

Issue

Section

Case Reports