DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20150071

Comparative study of intravenous iron sucrose versus ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in postpartum patients

Kishorkumar Vitthal Hol, Hemant Damle, Gulab Singh Shekhawat, Asha Hol

Abstract


Background: Objectives: To study the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose versus ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in postpartum patients.

Methods: Well compensated anemic postpartum patients with Hb between 7-11 gm% at 24 hours after delivery were included in the study. Patients were thoroughly investigated for hematological parameters. All patients were checked for hemoglobin and serum ferritin at 24 hours after delivery and 42 days after delivery. Each patient in mild and moderate anemia group has received a fixed dose of 500 mg and 1000 mg respectively of both compounds. All other iron supplements (except from diet) were withheld during follow up period.  

Results: Average rise in Hb in mild anemia group is 2.30 gm% with iron sucrose and 2.52 gm% with ferric carboxymaltose after 42 days of infusion. In moderate anemia group average Hb rise observed is 4.58 gm% with iron sucrose and 4.73 gm% with ferric carboxymaltose after 42 days. Significant improvement in iron stores is also observed at the end of 42 days in both groups. Unpaired‘t’ test was used to test the significance of rise and compare the rise between two groups. Both compounds have shown similar response and difference between them is not statistically significant.  

Conclusions: Fixed dose iron sucrose and ferric carboxymaltose are equally effective and safe for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in postpartum patients. 


Keywords


Iron sucrose, Ferric carboxymaltose, Postpartum iron deficiency anemia

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