DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20172588

Maternal and perinatal outcome in pregnancy with high BMI

Pallavi Singh, Rekha Wadhwani

Abstract


Background: BMI, body mass index is an important predictor of nutritional status of pregnant woman which has been considered as an important prognostic indicator of pregnancy outcomes. High maternal body mass index is related to various adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study is designed to see the effect of maternal BMI on pregnancy outcome and perinatal outcome.

Methods: this is a prospective hospital based study conducted from January 2015 to June 2015 in department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sultania Zanana Hospital, Bhopal, India. 20 Antenatal women attending OPD in Sultania Zanana hospital randomly selected for the study in their first trimester in their first visit fulfilling inclusion criteria. Their consent for the study was obtained.

Results: It was observed that majority of morbidly obese (66.6%) and obese (47.6%) women were belonging to upper socioeconomic class. Obesity is associated with increased incidence of pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, induced delivery, Instrument/assisted deliveries, caesarean delivery, ICU admissions complicating maternal outcome and LGA, NICU admissions and perinatal mortality complicating perinatal outcome.

Conclusions: Maternal BMI shows strong associations with pregnancy complications and outcomes. Obesity is associated with increased incidence of pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, induced delivery, Instrument/assisted deliveries, caesarean delivery, ICU admissions complicating maternal outcome and LGA, NICU admissions and perinatal mortality complicating perinatal outcome.


Keywords


Abnormal uterine bleeding, Body mass index, Intensive care unit, Large for gestational age, Neonatal intensive care unit, Post-partum hemorrhage, Small for gestational age

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