DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20181361

Ceasarean scar pregnancies, diagnosis and management

Atmajit Singh Dhillon, Sandeep Sood

Abstract


Background: Objective of present study was to describe evaluation and management of pregnancies implanted into uterine Cesarean section scars, Ceasarean scar pregnancies (CSP), is defined as gestational sac implanted in the myometrium at the site of a previous ceasarean scar. Also known as Ceasarean ectopic pregnancy.

Methods: In all antenatal patients attending the antenatal outpatient department of a tertiary care service hospital a transvaginal sonography was done for determining the gestational age as well as the viability of the pregnancy. In all patients with a history of previous Cesarean section(s), special effort was made to assess the possibility of implantation into the uterine scar by means of an early transvaginal and colour doppler ultrasound.

Results: Twelve Cesarean section scar pregnancies were diagnosed in a five-year period, of a tertiary care service hospital. Five (42%) patients with Cesarean scar pregnancies were treated surgically, four patients medically (33%), and two patients expectantly (17%) and one patient opted to continue the pregnancy. Surgical management was successful in all cases, although two of five (40%) women suffered bleeding (300-500ml). In the group of women who were managed medically the success rate was 3/4(75%). Expectant management was successful in one of two cases (50%). One patient who opted to continue pregnancy, underwent a ceasarean hysterectomy at 33 weeks of gestation for placenta accreta.

Conclusions: Incidence of ceasarean section scar pregnancies is increasing as is the increasing rate of ceasarean deliveries. A high index of suspicion in all cases of post ceasarean pregnancies, coupled with early transvaginal ultrasonography along with colour doppler confirmation and institution of early and individualized treatment, optimizes the clinical outcome. Although rare, the patient and her relatives must be made aware of the possibility of recurrent CSP.


Keywords


Ceasarean scar, Pregnancy

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References


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