DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20183299

An evaluation of association of vitamin D insufficiency with gestational hypertension in pregnant women

Khan Arshiya, Srivastava Meenakshi

Abstract


Background: Preeclampsia (PE) is a disease specific to pregnancy affecting many bodily systems. This is characterized by high blood pressure and proteinuria after the 20th week of pregnancy. The objective of this study was to evaluate of association of vitamin D insufficiency with gestational hypertension in pregnant women.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 104 pregnant women were included in the study. The diagnosis of gestational hypertension was confirmed using the “Report of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists’ Task Force on Hypertension in Pregnancy” criteria. Based on these criteria, patients with systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg (measured after a period of rest of four hours, twice daily) and proteinuria (≥300 mg protein/24 h) were diagnosed as gestational hypertension.

Results: Vitamin D deficiency was found among 78.9% (90/114) women. There was no significant (p >0.05) difference in age of women between vitamin D deficient and sufficient. Vitamin D level was significantly (p = 0.0001) lower among the women between Vitamin D deficient (15.93±4.66) and sufficient (35.70±3.25). There was no significant (p >0.05) association of Vitamin D level with parity, family history of hypertension, blood pressure, gestational age and fasting blood glucose. There was significant (p = 0.0001) difference in BMI between Vitamin D deficient (30.10±4.95) and sufficient (24.04±2.75). Tobacco consumption was also associated with the level of Vitamin D. There was significant negative correlation between BMI and Vitamin D level (r = -0.56, p = 0.00011).

Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that vitamin D plays a role in the ethology and pathophysiology of gestational hypertension. Among the population having the risk of vitamin D deficiency, the risk of pregnancy induced hypertension may be decreased through vitamin D supplementation.


Keywords


Gestational hypertension, Insufficiency, Pregnant women

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