DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20196026

Prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and its maternal outcome in a tertiary care hospital, Salem, Tamil Nadu, India

Subha Sivagami Sengodan, Sreeprathi N.

Abstract


Background: Hypertensive disorders complicate 5-10% of all pregnancies and together forms the deadly triad- along with hemorrhage and heart disease that contributes greatly to maternal morbidity and mortality. Objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and its maternal complications in patients attending obstetrics and gynaecology department, Government Mohan Kumaramangalam Medical College Hospital, Salem.

Methods: This is a prospective study conducted from August 2018 to July 2019 in the department of obstetrics and gynaecology. Patients diagnosed with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy was evaluated and data were collected.

Results: A total of 19,383 pregnant women visited obstetrics and gynaecology department over a period of one year, out of which 2028 were diagnosed with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Hence the prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is 10.4%. Among 2028 hypertensive disorder cases, Gestational hypertension were 962 cases (47.4%), pre-eclampsia 661 cases (32.6%), chronic hypertension 166 cases (8.2%) and pre-eclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension 239 cases (11.8%). The prevalence was highest among primigravida (54%) compared to multigravida (46%). Hypertensive disorders were highest among the age group of 18-22 years in our study. Most common maternal complication in our study was HELLP syndrome.

Conclusions: Prevalence of hypertensive disorders was high in our study. Early detection and timely intervention decrease the maternal complications.


Keywords


Gestational hypertension, Outcome, Pre-eclampsia, Prevalence, Systolic and diastolic blood pressure

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