DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2320-1770.ijrcog20201784

Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy and its impact on maternal and fetal outcome: a prospective study in a tertiary care hospital in Maharashtra, India

Sharin P. Barse, Vaishali R. Korde, Jaya S. Barla

Abstract


Background: Thyroid dysfunction is the commonest endocrinological disorder in pregnancy. A broad spectrum of adverse outcomes in pregnant women and the fetus have been reported which can be prevented by early diagnosis and treatment of thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy has not yet been extensively studied in India. Hence, this study was conducted for assessment of the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy and effect on the mother and her fetus.

Methods: This study is a prospective study conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynecology, MIMER Medical College and Hospital, Talegaon Dabhade, Maharashtra. A 3 years study. Antenatal women attending the outpatient and inpatient department of the hospital. The total sample population comprised of 698 pregnant women with uncomplicated singleton intra-uterine pregnancy. All participants were screened by estimation for serum TSH in first trimester. Immediately after delivery the cord blood sample was collected and cord blood TSH levels were estimated. Babies, whose cord blood TSH levels were elevated, were called for follow-up on day 5 of neonatal life and TSH, free T3 and free T4 levels were estimated. Among these babies, those diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism were started on appropriate treatment.

Results: The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy in present study was 17.90% whereas 82.1% patients were euthyroid (control group). Among the 17.9% patients with thyroid dysfunction, 14.6% had subclinical hypothyroidism, 1.9% had overt hypothyroidism and 1.4% had hyperthyroidism.

Conclusions: With this study, we can come to the conclusion that there is high prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. Thus, an early diagnosis and prevention of the aftermaths of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy is of utmost importance.


Keywords


Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism, Thyroid dysfunction

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References


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